It is a constant battle when it comes to equal representation in the law with Aboriginal People, or any other people of colour. Aboriginals are often misrepresented in the law. This can be displayed in two distinct ways — how their cases are treated, and how they are treated in other cases. Holmes Skinner refers to this situation perfectly in a Law and Style article. “It always bothered her when kids had trouble with the law and they never seemed to get the help they needed.”1 This is commonly referred to as the criminal justice system failing Aboriginals. Oftentimes criminal cases are ruled in a manner that does not leave families and loved ones feeling the closure and/or justice they deserve. As mentioned before, the missing and murdered cases (in which cases involve death or disappearance of the Indigenous, but are ruled out to have not involved foul play) are in globally recognized position. In addition, hundreds of families have also been left with unresolved cases in regards to the missing women in their life. Vanessa Corado is one of the many people who have suffered with the disappearance of a mother Freda Whiteman, where she feels despondent with her city’s police results of her case. She filed two missing persons reports, and three years after the first one, she found out that there was no record of her doing so, despite the fact that completely remembered doing so. Commissioner Qajaq Robinson recognized this dismay and promised that something would be done about it. (had said) “These systems that are supposed to be in place to serve and protect and help us — what are they doing about the issue of violence, and what are they not doing?” 2 Though not to take away from the severity of the case, Freda Whiteman is only one fraction of the group of missing Indigenous women around Canada with an open end. There are women falling from 13-story buildings and the cause of death remains ‘unknown’. It is the sense of disappointment that is prominent in these situations.