Jean need for sociopolitical and economic advancements. As a

Jean Jacques Rousseau’s philosophical interpretation of arts and sciences is apparent that the developments in the mentioned fields are disintegrating human moral values. Unlike the ancient era when society acknowledged complete talents and ethical values, the current generations tend to emulate what others do at the expense of pursuing creativity. Equally, restoration and emphasis on quality education are slowly transforming the present generations into objects that depend on technology, science, and art for survival. Rousseau describes that overdependence on science and art has turned human beings into happy slaves (Rosen, Wolff , 1999). In essence, it means that humankind lack originality or independence of thoughts and ideas about the concept of evil and good. Overall, extreme dependence on new ideas facilitated by advancements in science and arts is slowly eroding indigenous knowledge and institutional frameworks that guide cultural values and events. Nations emphasize the need for sociopolitical and economic advancements. As a result, countries formulate laws and policies aimed at promoting civilization. The particular areas of consideration involve enhancement of education standards to empower people to embrace new strategies for solving the prevailing social and economic challenges. In this regard, civilization is mainly paralleled to the economic, political and cultural of nations especially the developed ones. As a result, diverse nations formulate development blueprints to permit them to attain the level of socioeconomic status of the perceived developed nations. The development plans disregard the uniqueness if every community as aimed to establish equality. According to Rousseau’s argument, it is unjust to assume that development is characterized by the transformations in the social order (Rosen, Wolff, & McKinnon, 1999).