Many Dodgers and numerous others. For example, there was

Many individuals know about the legitimate issues of racial reconciliation in sports like Jackie Robinson with the Dodgers and numerous others. For example, there was a man by the name of Perry Wallace who experienced childhood in Nashville, Tennessee and went to Pearl Senior High School. After high school he furthered his education and athletic career at Vanderbilt University. Perry would be the first African American to play in the Southeastern Conference. He then proceeded to break racial barriers.Perry Wallace was born on February 1948 in Nashville to Perry E and Hattie Haynes Wallace. He is the youngest of the six kids that they had, he went to elementary and middle school at one of Nashville’s isolated schools. Where he lived and attended school was all black. But Vanderbilt basketball coach Roy Skinner wanted to blur the line between black and white in the Southeastern Conference. He began recruiting Wallace during his junior year of high school. “Segregation was the law of the land and that meant you didn’t work into your plans going to colleges where blacks were not allowed or were discouraged from thinking about going,” (English) Wallace said. He was a straight A student and the class valedictorian, graduated in June 1966 from Pearl Senior High School. Wallace played in the post on Pearl’s ball team, where he was known for his terrific dunks. Between the years of 1965 and 1966, the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association (TSSAA) enabled African Americans to take an interest, and Pearl High School Tigers ran through district, regional, and state competitions. Wallace said, “But March 19, 1966, wasn’t a date that would go down only in Tennessee high school basketball history. That very same night, in College Park, Maryland, Texas Western was taking on Adolph Rupp’s Kentucky Wildcats for the NCAA men’s basketball championship. For those who rushed home from Vanderbilt’s gym to catch the end of the college title game, it was like watching a mirror image of what they had just witnessed, Rupp’s all-white Wildcats against Don Haskins’ lineup of all-black Miners. Texas Western’s victory — in what some call the most important college basketball game ever played — was a death-blow to segregated hoops, just as Pearl’s win had been at the high school level that very same night.” (History on the Hardwood) Toward the finish of an undefeated season, Pearl Senior High School turned into the main African American group to win the TSSAA’s Boys’ State Basketball Tournament, posting an ideal period of thirty-one and a two season, forty-three game winning streak. They averaged nineteen points and twelve rebounds per game. The Tigers also won three straight Tennessee high school basketball championships. TSSAA All-American Perry Wallace was recruited by more than eighty schools and colleges, however in May 1966 he signed his letter of intent  with Vanderbilt University. Wallace was so close to the university and he never imagined attending a school that caliber with the hate that was towards african americans. Vanderbilt, like most schools in the South, was part of the white world. He was the first  African American “Commodore” to take an interest in varsity sports at Vanderbilt University and in the SEC.In his first year, Wallace experienced isolation’s at Mississippi State, the University of Tennessee, and Auburn University. He finished his first year averaging seventeen points and twenty rebounds per game. On December 2, 1967, Wallace was the first African American student-athlete to compete in the SEC.  He encountered prejudice even under the least favorable conditions, especially at SEC schools in Alabama and Mississippi. On the basketball court, he experienced an Ole Miss boycott and the rabid hate of the Mississippi State fans in Starkville. Following his freshman year, the NCAA instituted “the Lew Alcindor rule,” which deprived Wallace of his signature move, the slam dunk. In the article Perry E Wallace Jr it says, “Cheerleaders led a volley of invective racist cheers. There were threats of beatings, castration, and lynching. He endured physical abuse on the court that referees refused to acknowledge as fouls. Wallace was harangued, taunted, and threatened throughout his SEC career.” (Wynn) Wallace had it very rough throughout his career when going on the road and playing against other opponents. At the point when racial barriers stood up to him, Perry Wallace rationally withdrew toward the north Nashville school where he last encountered the solace and comfort of group bolster. Wallace stated, “While coaches and teammates chose not to see the racism, “I . . . wanted somebody to say, you’re not crazy, I heard those people . . . calling you ‘nigger’ and threatening to hang you, I . . . want you to know I’m with you.” Struggling to stay inbounds between whites who needed him to fizzle and African Americans who anticipated that him would be a “whiz,” Wallace turned into the quintessential “association man.” (Wynn) He never struck back against players who vindictively fouled him. Wallace understood that any apparent unfortunate behavior on his part could obstruct the advance of SEC integration. While the most discernible individual on the ball court, he was unnoticed on the Vanderbilt grounds; known by all, nobody knew him. Wallace perceived that the vast majority neglected to consider him to be a full individual; in addition, they had no understanding of the issues of African Americans.The first African American to finish four years in the SEC, Perry Wallace finished his residency as the captain of the Vanderbilt varsity team and second-group All SEC. The senior class voted Wallace Bachelor of Ugliness, an honor awarded to the most popular and most appreciated male class member. He was also drafted by the Philadelphia 76ers in 1970. Respect granted to the most prevalent and most refreshing male class part. After his graduation, the colleges of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Kentucky opened the 1970 SEC season with integrated varsity groups.A pioneer in the integration of SEC games, Wallace earned a four year college education in engineering in 1970 from Vanderbilt University. In 1975 he moved on from Columbia University’s School of Law. While presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan were in office, Wallace served as an attorney in the U.S. Department of Justice. He dealt with natural resources and environmental law. In 1992, he was appointed to the Environmental Policy advisory council of the EPA. He became a professor of law at The American University Washington College of Law in 1993, where he specializes in environmental law, corporate law and finance. He is a member of the National Panel of Arbitrators, National Association of Securities Dealers Dispute Resolution and has recently been elected to the Board of Directors of the Environmental Working Group. He has written many chapters, articles and scholarly works on environmental issues, corporate governance and other issues. Perry Wallace had many accomplishments while playing for Vanderbilt. He was second-team All-SEC his senior season and finished with 1,010 points and 894 rebounds. A three-year letterman, he remains the school’s second-leading rebounder. SEC Sportsmanship Trophy, 1970; Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame inductee, 2003; SEC Living Legend honoree, 2004. In the article Wallace Perry E. Jr. Biography, it says “Though he retired from sports shortly after his college career, Wallace remains one of Vanderbilt University’s most acclaimed athletes. In 2003 he was inducted into the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame, and in 2004 he represented Vanderbilt as an “SEC Living Legend” honoree at the SEC Basketball Tournament in Atlanta.” (Wallace Perry E. Jr. Biography)  Also that year, Vanderbilt retired his basketball jersey, making him only the third athlete in the school’s history to receive this honor. Perry Wallace plays a significant role in Tennessee History. He started out as a kid going to an all black school and people didn’t give them a chance because they lived in the south, but Wallace overcame the adversity and pursued his career at Vanderbilt University. Not only did he go to an all white school, he made history for being the first african american to play in the southeastern conference and graduated from one of the most prestigious schools in the United States.