The do so. Being diagnosed with cancer and Augustus

The novel, The Fault in Our Stars written by the author, John Green is rated 5/5 stars by The New York TImes Bestseller which keeps you at the edge of your seat till the very end. The story of Hazel and Augustus takes the readers on an emotional rollercoaster, captivating your attention throughout the entirety of the novel. The story takes you on a journey through the lives of two cancer patients, it teaches us how even they desire a normal human life. The struggles and disadvantages of a cancer patient are demonstrated in this novel, as in every waking hour Hazel envisions a life without sickness. John Green incorporates the literary devices of irony, symbolism, and foreshadowing to personify the story of Hazel and Augustus. Symbolism is the very first literary device which is present throughout the entirety of the novel, The Fault in Our Stars. The author incorporates many meaningful symbols through the story to create a representation of the lives of Hazel and Augustus. A tangible object which is introduced in the novel and holds a significant meaning is Augustus Waters cigarette when he holds it between his lips to “create a metaphor.” Augustus purchases a pack of cigarettes to display to the world that you cannot let something so deadly dominate power over yourself unless you give it the will to do so. Being diagnosed with cancer and Augustus purchasing cigarettes makes it ironic as well, but like others he does not let something so worthless and meaningless take complete control over his life. The cigarettes which Augustus keeps represents death if he decides to smoke them as it lessens his chances of a longer life and deteriorates his health even more. At the same moment it symbolizes life and his chance to live normally if he decides not to let the cigarette overrule and define his reality. As he holds the cigarette in between his lips he takes charge and control of his life knowing only he has the ability to let something lessen his life. A second literary device which is present in the novel is flashback and the author incorporates this to show the readers of Hazel’s life before her sickness. A flashback assists the readers to comprehend how Hazel had a normal life like everyone else, she had best friends, and attended school on a regular basis. The author has a purpose when he does this to show how Hazel can still live a normal life even when she is battling the disease of cancer. She can relate to normal people even in the way that she and Augustus have fallen in love like teenagers their age have, and they both can enjoy normal lives with no obstacles. The last and final literary device which John Green incorporates into his novel is the irony of the relationship of Augustus Waters and Hazel Grace. Acknowledging the limited time Hazel has with her sickness, she is hesitant to begin her relationship with Augustus knowing the heartbreak she believes Agustus will have to face once she is gone. She falls in love with Gus either ways and even though she knows the heartbreak they both will face she takes her risk with the little time she has left. The little physical aches and pains Gus feels over the course of the novel hints there is a chance his cancer might have spread to his body once again, even with the guarantee his doctor gave that he is officially cancer free. His death essentially comes soon before hers and the ironic element incorporated is he breaks her heart, instead of her bringing him heartbreak first. The author included a very cruel but yet ironic literary device of Gus passing away before Hazel when she believed she had less time left than Agustus.Readers of this novel, along with myself would recommend it to audiences who are fond of star crossed lovers, destined romance, and young love. Other excellent novels which readers of The Fault in Our Stars would enjoy are “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl” written by Jesse Andrews, “If I Stay” published by Gayle Forman, “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” by Stephen Chbosky, and “13 Reasons Why” written by Jay Asher. All of these novels along with The Fault in Our Stars have been produced into films and television shows which have all been astoundingly successful.