The fuel, ethanol, heat and electricity, as potable plants

The main product obtained from sugar beet is sugar, and sugar has the ability to ferment easily with microorganism. 20 kg of molasses containing approximately 50% sucrose are obtained from one ton of sugar beet. After the root sacrose and molasses are obtained, the pulp is left behind. It represents 22% to 28% dry matter in the sugar beet root, which is insoluble after extraction of sugar beets and has the ability to ferment. During the conversion of sugar to ethanol, yeast and some bacteria play a role in the fermentation of sugars through anaerobic digestion. Almost half of the world’s ethanol fuel production is produced from sugar plants (mostly sugar cane) and the remaining half is produced from grains. Sugar plants can be grown in very large areas of the world. For this reason, it has some advantages over grains. Sugar beets have another advantage over grains and other cellulose-containing plants. This is because they need to be fermented directly and require less time. Sugar cane, sugar beet and sweet sorghum can be converted into liquid fuel, ethanol, heat and electricity, as potable plants with potent energy conversion potential.
Situation in the World
6.6 billion liters of ethanol corn (42%), wheat (33%), sugar beet (18%) and other cereals (7%) were produced in EU countries in 2014. A total of 10.5 million tons of grain and 2.21 million tons of non-quota sugar beets (white sugar equivalent) were used for ethanol production. These values ??correspond to 8% of sugar beet production with 2% of European cereal production for 2014. Europe has a very small share in the production of 90.5 million liters of renewable ethanol produced in 2014 in the world. Most of the ethanol produced is directed towards domestic renewable fuel as internal fuel. The USA (60%) and Brazil (30%) are the countries that produce the most ethanol and the production in the European Union is lower (7%).