The intervention strategy is the beginning of the detailed

The Public Fire Education Planning: A Five-Step Process is a
guide that helps any community to develop a fire safety program. Below are the
five steps.

·        
Conducting a community risk
analysis

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·        
Develop community
partnerships

·        
Create an intervention
strategy

·        
Implement the strategy

·        
Evaluate the results

Step 1: Conduct a Community Risk
Analysis

A community risk analysis is a process that identifies fire
and life safety problems and the

demographic characteristics of those at risk in a community.

Step 2: Develop Community
Partnerships

A community partner is a person, group, or organization
willing to join forces and address

a community risks. The most effective risk reduction efforts
are those that involve the community

in the planning and solution process.

Step 3: Create an Intervention
Strategy

An intervention strategy is the beginning of the detailed
work necessary for the development

of a successful fire or life safety risk reduction process. The
risk reduction efforts

involve combined prevention interventions:

Education: Providing information about risk.

Engineering: Using technology to create safer products or
modifying the environment

where the risk is occurring.

Enforcement: Rules that require the use of a safety
initiative.

Step 4: Implement the Strategy

Implementing the strategy involves testing the interventions
and then putting the plan into

action in the community. It’s important that the
implementation is well-coordinated and sequenced

appropriately. Implementation occurs when the intervention
strategy is put in place

and the implementation plan schedules are followed.

Step 5: Evaluate the Results

The primary goal of the evaluation process is to demonstrate
that the risk reduction efforts

are reaching target populations and have the planned impact.
The evaluation plan measures performance on several levels, outcome, impact,
and process

objectives.