The story a “cold” feelings, with the added use

The Role Of Settings In Literature    While being overlooked at times, the setting in stories can play a significant factor into how the reader interprets the story’s atmosphere. Stories by authors such as Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne fully showcase how the setting can important to the story’s tone.    In the story Young Goodman Brown, Nathaniel Hawthorne utilizes the setting in a descriptive way. His first instance is in the beginning of the story, where the main character begins his journey, “He had taken a dreary road, darkened by all the gloomiest tres of the forest” (8). This description of the setting, give the audience a feeling of suspense, which establishes how the story will unfold. Later in the story, the setting again has an effect. “…a cloud, though no wind was stirring, hurried across the zenith, and hid the brightening stars. The blue sky was still visible, except directly overhead, where this black mass of cloud was sweeping swiftly northward” (Goodman 47). The presence of a dark cloud, usually associated with bad things to come, enhances the story’s plot, as we see the main character lose his morale and will, after everything he believed in was deemed a facade.    Another author to implement setting into how his story develops is Edgar Allan Poe. Poe uses dark, gloomy settings, to set a certain mood of the story, usually associated with horror or bad omen. An example of Poe’s setting technique is in The Raven. “Ah distinctly I remember, it was in the bleak December” ( Poe 2). The setting of December, winter, gives the story a “cold” feelings, with the added use of the work “bleak”, hints at a somber vibe within the story. In the same story, Poe then again uses the setting to its advantage. “Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,” (Poe 5). Using descriptive, stylistic writing, Poe creates suspense in mystery that take place in just a few moments within the story.